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Objective

The objective of ISRO (Indian Space Research Organization) is to develop space technology and its application to various tasks of national and international interest. Accordingly, it has successfully put into operation two major satellite systems, namely the Indian National Satellites (INSAT) for communication services and the Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) satellites for management for natural resources. It has also developed various launch vehicles, like the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV), etc. for launching satellites. INSAT or the Indian National Satellite System is a series of multipurpose Geo-stationary satellites launched by ISRO to satisfy the telecommunications, broadcasting, meteorology, and search and rescue operations. Commissioned in 1983, INSAT is the largest domestic communication system in the Asia Pacific Region. It is a joint venture of the Department of Space, Department of Telecommunications, India Meteorological Department, All India Radio and Doordarshan. The overall coordination and management of INSAT system rests with the Secretary-level INSAT Coordination Committee. INSAT satellites provide transponders in various bands (C, S, Extended C and Ku) to serve the television and communication needs of India. Some of the satellites also have the Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR), CCD cameras for metrological imaging. The satellites also incorporate transpon er(s) for receiving distress alert signals for search and rescue missions in the South Asian and Indian Ocean Region, as ISRO is a member of the Cospas-Sarsat programme. The Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (Hindi: ? ? ?), commonly known by its abbreviation PSLV, is an expendable launch system developed and operated by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). It was developed to allow India to launch its Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) satellites into sun synchronous orbits, a service that was, until the advent of the PSLV, commercially viable only from Russia. PSLV can also launch small size satellites into geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). The PSLV has launched 55 satellites / spacecrafts ( 26 Indian and 29 Foreign Satellites) into a variety of orbits so far.[2] PSLV has a flyaway cost of 17 million USD for each launch.The Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (usually known by its abbreviation, GSLV) is an expendable launch system operated by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). It was developed to enable India to launch its INSAT-type satellites into geostationary orbit and to make India less dependent on foreign rockets. GSLV has accomplished seven launches to date, since its first launch in 2001 through its most recent launch in 2010. Two launches have been successful, with one launch partially successful. Four launches have failed. The eighth flight for the GSLV is scheduled for early 2013.

 
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